The Dance of Colors in My Imagination-An Interview with Young Painter Yong Jiayong
Source:Artintern.net Author:Sun Qian Date: 2013-08-14 Size:
Works by young painter Yang Jiayong contain magic aboriginality that passes through and permeates from outward appearance to inner essence and enables the works to show considerable a stretching force from their abstract, free qualities usually crossing the gap between specific reality and imagination that display amazing and vent-out effects. From his distinctive creations it can be seen that he is a painter who loves the great land and life. He has attempted to step in from the daily life to the fairy tales and handle them in his own way.

  Works by young painter Yang Jiayong contain magic aboriginality that passes through and permeates from outward appearance to inner essence and enables the works to show considerable a stretching force from their abstract, free qualities usually crossing the gap between specific reality and imagination that display amazing and vent-out effects. From his distinctive creations it can be seen that he is a painter who loves the great land and life. He has attempted to step in from the daily life to the fairy tales and handle them in his own way.

  In terms of his age and painting experiences, Yang Jiayong paints his works in such a wide range that is amazing. After stepping out from his Zen meditation in his Desiring to Violate Series made in his school days and his Neo-proletariat Ideal made in his early years after his graduation, he has entered into a wonderful, mystical condition.

  Sun Qian (hereinafter referred to as Sun): I’ve learnt that you are fond of traditional Chinese painting, why did you shift to the oil painting art as the orientation of your pursuit? Is there any special reason behind this?

  Yang Jiayong (hereinafter referred to as Yang): It was in my childhood that I began to learn traditional Chinese painting; in my high school days I fell in love with western painting so that I went to a training class. Later I was lucky enough to be enrolled into the oil painting major of the first session of the Sichuan Conservatory of Music. It was the year of 1999.

  Sun: Image is the main form of expression in the traditional Chinese painting while visual effect of color is the artistic form of expression in oil painting. Why do you purposely mix the two different forms of expression in many of your works?

  Yang: To me, oriental painting or occidental painting, though there is difference in the type of paintings, have things in common in the pursuit of art. All roads lead to Rome as the saying goes. My orientation in art creation is to make innovations from the position of humankind’s culture. I don’t oppose, nor reject but I do accept and do think over so that I feel free in my creation process, choosing whatever I want for myself.

  Sun: Your teacher Ma Yiping is good at realist painting while your works mostly bear free-style characteristics, plus abstract language features. How do such reversed operations take place between you and your teacher? Have you learned specific artistic means from your teacher or just some spiritual guidance?

  Yang: Those who have physically experienced Mr. Ma’s teaching method know that he is an inclusive wise man who has his own distinct artistic experiences. In his exchanges with us, he would often say “What development possibility I find you have in your method?” It is his heuristic teaching method that fostered our capability in independent artistic thinking. I’m grateful for him.

  Sun: In one of your articles about your works, you said that your works display some accidental state and natural state. You don’t pursue to carry major themes and ideas in your works so that you yourself and the viewers will feel relaxed, it’s enough to enjoy the interest and feel pleasant in the heart. But from your Desiring to Violate Series I feel a hesitant hint, which is understood by some as Zen meditation, but do you approve understanding it this way? In your Neo-proletariat Ideal, I feel that you expressed the contemporary people’s strong desire for material life. You depicted cartoon-like shaped machines whereby to show a futurist tendency. How do you view this phenomenon?

  Yang: In the past 12 years since my university days, from establishment of my thought to the impact of the reality, I find it is the society that has changed me, forcing me to ponder over something that enabled me to become matured gradually on the road to art.

  The Desiring to Violate Series were my works during my undergraduate studies. Influenced by the western art of design, I was keen on the study of a very simple form, thinking how to bring the visual effects of the frame up to a quiet but tensional realm. Many friends say my paintings at that time depict a unique Buddhist mood from my own understanding, which may be accidental. This series lasted to the time of graduation from my post-graduate studies.

  The Neo-proletariat Ideal series were small episodes in my thought after graduation as we faced pressures from love affairs, marriage, family chore, social status, and material life and so on so that I used some concrete material signs to get something off my chest and keep on questioning. In my creation work that was like question marks, I felt more and more boring as I couldn’t find the joy of painting. I can’t say that my works in this batch are critical. I got no result but only experiences.

  Sun: You once said that many of your works in your Fairy Tale Series are based on Mountain and Sea Classics and Commentary on the Waterways Classic. Do you have a fond love for the stories in these two ancient books? Mountain and Sea Classics is half true and half false and the relation between them is inter-promoted. Your brushwork and language approach correspond to the things in the books. What have you associated your depiction of fairy tales with the real world?

  Yang: The two books enlightened my imagination and are very helpful to me, but at the same time they also branded a mark of the era in my imagination.

  Sun: The cultural and spiritual connotation in artistic creation is dependent on the comprehensive quality that an artist has, including his knowledge, training, cultural deposits, disposition, and comprehension and so on. Whence came your imagination?

  Yang: My imagination is sheer accidental, an impromptu imagination. Every object that provokes my cranial nerve will link and integrate the memories in my mind to form into a full picture. The impromptu imagination that I talk of is an indispensible element in my creation.

  Sun: What influences your aesthetic tendency has on you in the formation of your style? Although your current creation is saltatory, your color and composition already bear the characteristics of a style. Do you like to be a painter with a distinct style?

  Yang: I think one’s experiences will change along with the change of the person himself. I like my own style to be distinct so that I can have a label for others to recognize, but this label needs to be changed from time to time. It will be hazardous if it’s not changed.

  Sun: Do you have other hobby or aptitude besides painting? And what role have they played in your creation? As you are young and you have a long way to go, what plan or expectation do you have on the road of painting?

  Yang: I love to go to the curios market. I love the texture of antiques that time has imprinted in, which throws me into imagination. I also love to make little handicraft as it relieves me from my visual fatigue. I’m apolitical and I love the time of peace and prosperity. The calm, easy and comfortable life can’t blot out my imaginative cranial nerve. I hope to carry on my painting happily on the road to art, keeping on imagining, and that will be sufficient!

  (Sun Qian: Poet)

[Editor] 常霞

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