The Nature of Video and the Expression of Human Emotions
Source:Artintern.net Date: 2010-01-19 Size:
The term "video" commonly covers a vast range of activities, including feature films on video tape, music videos, home video recordings, closed circuit video surveillance, corporate and information video, video used for legal evidence in the police and court systems, television, internet, and, we shouldn't forget video art in all its manifestations.

 

The term "video" commonly covers a vast range of activities, including feature films on video tape, music videos, home video recordings, closed circuit video surveillance, corporate and information video, video used for legal evidence in the police and court systems, television, internet, and, we shouldn't forget video art in all its manifestations.

We can link the word "video" to specific objects like videotape or video cameras and obvious related practices and as much as there is heterogeneity of practices, which go under the same name, the purposes are as diverse - showing that the term is archaic and that "video" is a hybrid medium in constant transformation.

This current uncertainty about the role and nature of "video" and the inclusion of disciplinary boundaries is linked to a broader crisis in knowledge, a characteristic of our times.

The displacement of the traditional culture by the rise of a spectacular image suggests that as much as video offers a new kind of object, it is also part of a profound transformation of the social and cultural conditions within which is produced.

The various manifestations of Video Art throughout the last 40 years provide us an alternative parallel timetable where unquestionably were eliminated the concerns, techniques and problems inherited from more academic art forms. In most cases, the artists who use video developed a process of exploration and reduction, by the elimination of all extrinsic characteristics until they arrive at what is, presumably, a core, an essence.

The assumption that by stripping the medium down to its unique features will lead us to its innermost core, its own proper identity is just one side of the question. It is for the artist to trace a concern, not so much for limiting the specificity of different media, but for understanding their interrelationships. In other words, video artists today are most often interested in the hybrid rather than the pure, in transformation and intersection rather than discrete and stable boundaries.

Video is, therefore, one of the most prolific visual mediums in use today.

Contributions from the extensive collection of the Human Emotion Project, founded and directed by the South African artist Alison Williams, give Macau a selection that links together more than 40 voices from all over the world.

"Paradox", "Loss & Desire", "Transformation" and "Fantasy" are the chosen themes for understanding video art, its own multiplicity and reunion around the imaginative subject of The Human Emotion Project (HEP).

"Paradox", "Loss & Desire", "Transformation" and "Fantasy" are the chosen themes for understanding video art here, its own multiplicity and reunion around the imaginative subject of The Human Emotion Project (HEP).

The artists in "Paradox" investigate the contradictions between documentary and performance, fact and fiction, order & chaos. What is real and what is staged? The absurdity of real life, the ambiguity of movement and the enigma of space are some of the perceptions raised in "Paradox".

"Loss & Desire" explores the ambiguity of misplaced feelings from philosophical aspects to the emotional. The strong deficit of engagement, the desire for connection and the interior struggle for clarity are present in each work.

The power of "Transformation" is a vibrant and integral part of all of our lives. The mystery of life forever changing, the spirituality of isolated gestures and sounds and the manipulation of these elements compose a space of reflection and intimacy.

"Fantasy" draws inspiration from the apparent fascination of lively graphic imagery. The looping of the modern era, the provocation of literature, the encounter with the fantastical and the employment of technology contribute to the process making of these visual stories.

Stay tuned, the show is about to begin.

[Editor] Elemy Liu

    Artintern