University of Essex to rehouse its Latin American collection
Source:The Art Newspaper Author:Anny Shaw Date: 2014-11-03 Size:
The University of Essex says the future of its Latin American art collection is secure, despite a report of plans to sell it off...

Raquel Forner, Terráqueos en marcha (Earthlings on the move), 1977. University of Essex Collection of Latin American Art

The University of Essex says the future of its Latin American art collection is secure, despite a report of plans to sell it off.

The idea of de-acquisition was first mooted around two years ago, according to the writer and academic Marina Warner, who resigned from her post as a professor in the university’s department of literature, film and theatre studies earlier this summer. In an article published in theLondon Review of Books in September, Warner says the university is becoming a “for-profit” enterprise.

Joanne Harwood, the director of the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (Escala), says the collection is not at risk and is due to be rehoused in a new gallery at the university’s Colchester campus next year.

“The space will function as a centre for researchers, as a training museum for our curatorial studies students and as a space for public access,” she says. A spokesman for the university says there have never been plans to sell the collection and that it “continues to expand”.

Escala was established in 1993 and includes more than 750 works by artists such as Cildo Meireles, Rufino Tamayo and Julio Cesar. Contributors to the collection include the curator Gabriel Pérez Barreiro, the collectors Charles Cosac and Simone and Michael Naify, and the Durini Gallery. To mark its 20th anniversary the university has organised a large show drawn from the collection at the new Beecroft Art Gallery in Southend (until 6 December).

Meanwhile, an agreement to display works from the collection at Firstsite, a gallery in Colchester, ended in autumn last year, according to the university spokesman.

Matthew Rowe, the director of Firstsite, says the gallery is “regenerating” its partnership with the university in relation to its Latin American art collection and courses in contemporary curating and art history. Rather than exhibiting works from the collection, Rowe says he wants to “explore potential opportunities for co-commissions with the university”.

[Editor] 刘建兰

    Artintern